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5 facts about birth control

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5 facts about birth control

Birth Control Video Center

Last Updated: Apr 16, 2021 8: 12: 41 PM

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Turning to telehealth for birth control? Here’s what you should know.


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All About Telehealth for Birth Control

Telehealth allows doctors to care for people virtually over a phone call, text message, or most commonly, video chat.

Although some situations require an in-person visit, telehealth is a great option when you can’t get to the doctor’s office for your birth control.

If you’re new to telehealth, here’s what you need to know.

State Medicaid programs and private insurers coverage of telehealth varies, so confirm your coverage in advance.

With telehealth, even though you’re not in the doctor’s office, your private health information is still covered by HIPAA, so it will remain confidential and secure.

Although your gynecologist can’t give you a physical exam via telehealth, they can write prescriptions and offer quality care, especially if you prepare in advance.

Before your telehealth appointment:

– Think about your reproductive goals

– Write down any questions you have about birth control and reproductive health

– Keep track of your cycle and any symptoms you experience, such as cramping or acne

– If you’re currently on birth control, list any side effects, including pain, spotting, excessive bleeding, or weight gain

– Compile a list of your health conditions and all medications, as some forms of birth control might not be as safe or effective for you

– Charge your computer or phone

– Make sure your internet is reliable

– Download any telehealth apps your specific provider may require

– Find a quiet, private space to conduct the call

– Be prepared with pen and paper or a note-taking app

Turn to Healthgrades to connect with the right gynecologist to prescribe birth control via telehealth. And share this video to spread the word!

2020 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. The content on Healthgrades does not provide medical advice. Always consult a medical provider for diagnosis and treatment. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced
or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use
of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement.

Birth Control Video Center

Last Updated: Apr 16, 2021 8: 12: 48 PM

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Looking into contraception options? Here are five things you may not know about birth control.


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5 Things You Didn’t Know About Birth Control

1. In addition to preventing pregnancy, certain forms of hormonal birth control may ease some of your worst period symptoms, like cramping or heavy bleeding-they might even improve your acne.

2. Some medications can lower the effectiveness of your contraception. So talk to your doctor to figure out which form of birth control is right for you.

3. The Affordable Care Act requires healthcare plans cover birth control medication. If you have health insurance, your birth control is probably free. And if you don’t, you might be able to access free or low-cost contraception from certain clinics.

4. For some women, birth control pills alleviate their headaches. But those who experience migraines with aura have an increased risk of stroke when taking some forms of hormonal birth control.

5. While many women prefer hormonal birth control, there are many non-hormonal options as well, like condoms, copper IUDs, cervical caps, contraceptive sponges, and contraceptive gels.

Turn to Healthgrades to connect with the right gynecologist to prescribe birth control. And share this video to help spread the word!

2020 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. The content on Healthgrades does not provide medical advice. Always consult a medical provider for diagnosis and treatment. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced
or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use
of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement.

Birth Control Video Center

Last Updated: Apr 14, 2021 6: 12: 42 PM

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Women decide to go on birth control for many reasons, from regulating period to preventing pregnancy. These women share their birth control journeys and discuss what they’ve learned.


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Elena:Having really open and honest, raw conversations with doctors, friends, family members is really important, especially for topics that have a history of being stigmatized.

Taylor:The type of birth control that I’m on right now is the birth control pill.

Elena:I am currently on the birth control pill.

Emily:I’m using an IUD.

Taylor:I had received my period, actually, very young. I had excruciating period symptoms.

Elena:I was struggling with painful cramps during times of menstruation. My Ob/Gyn suggested that birth control would help with painful cramps.

Emily:I needed birth control to regulate my periods.

Taylor:Birth control actually covered a whole other umbrella of helping people with their period symptoms.

Elena:The birth control aspect of the pill is important as well. I think it allows for a lot of flexibility.

Emily:I tried a lot of different birth controls throughout the years. A lot of different pills, I tried some rings. I wanted something that was actually going to work, that I didn’t have to worry about and have peace of mind. My doctor was the one who recommended I switch over to an IUD.

Elena:Modern medicine has made it really easy for us to take our health into our own hands, whether proactively or retroactively, but especially with birth control options.

Emily:I think it’s fantastic that women have a lot of options. One size does not fit all.

Taylor:If there are women who are seeking out birth control options, I definitely do recommend that you consult your doctor, because they will give you a full evaluation on which might fit your lifestyle better.

Elena:Talking to my doctor was what helped me the most when making this decision. My doctor is the best source of information for helping me decide what choice to implement in my life.

Emily:Taking control over your life and your destiny and choosing when you want to alter it, when you are ready, is so important. So just keep trying until you find the right fit.

2020 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. The content on Healthgrades does not provide medical advice. Always consult a medical provider for diagnosis and treatment. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced
or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use
of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement.

Birth Control Video Center

Last Updated: Apr 14, 2021 6: 25: 55 PM

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Women today have more birth control options than ever before, from pills to IUDs to condoms to gels. Learn from these healthcare professionals about how they help women choose the right birth control for them.


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Dr. Amy Brenner:The conversation about contraceptive options is definitely a lot longer now than it used to be and it’s really exciting because there’s so many options for women to choose from for birth control.

Dr. Vanessa Parisi:When making a recommendation to a patient about birth control, I have to consider the individual patient, what their fertility goals are, what their menstrual cycle is like. And as a woman myself, I know what I think about when I choose a birth control. So I want to make sure that the patients have all the options that are safe for them, and then let them choose and advocate for themselves.

Dr. Amy Brenner:In the hormonal aspect of birth control, probably everybody knows about the pill because I think that was one of the very first options.

Dr. Vanessa Parisi:There are estrogen- and progesterone-containing pills, those are combined oral contraceptives. There are progesterone-only containing pills.

Casey-Ann Collins:We also have the transdermal hormonal patch. There’s also the vaginal ring as well as a hormonal rod.

Dr. Vanessa Parisi:And there’s a progesterone-containing injection that’s given every three months. There’s also progesterone-containing intrauterine devices. And in the United States, there are four varieties that are used, that last for different lengths of time.

Dr. Amy Brenner:The other category for contraception are non-hormonal options for birth control.

Casey-Ann Collins:One example would be the intrauterine device, specifically the copper IUD. We have barrier methods such as male and female condoms, as well as diaphragms.

Dr. Amy Brenner:In fact, there’s a new gel that women can apply with each episode of intercourse.

Casey-Ann Collins:Some of the factors that I consider when making recommendations for birth control include age, lifestyle.

Dr. Vanessa Parisi:If you’re not going to be able to take a pill every day, you should say it. We want your birth control to be successful. We want you to be protected.

Casey-Ann Collins:I try to make my patients feel as comfortable as possible. Though I’m a medical professional, I like to be real down to earth so they feel comfortable to ask those questions, those myths, or rumors that friends and family may have told them about birth control. So I just really try to create an environment that’s very comfortable for my patients, kind of like girl talk.

Dr. Vanessa Parisi:Women need to be able to trust their gynecologist. I always say if you can’t trust your gynecologist, who can you trust? Our job as physicians is to really make sure that you’re well taken care of and we’re giving you the safest method, but also that’s making you happiest and most comfortable.

2020 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. The content on Healthgrades does not provide medical advice. Always consult a medical provider for diagnosis and treatment. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced
or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use
of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement.

Birth Control Video Center

Last Updated: Apr 14, 2021 6: 31: 17 PM

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Non-hormonal birth control can be the right choice for many women, with few side effects. Learn from the experts about non-hormonal birth control options available today.


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Casey-Ann Collins:A woman may not qualify for a hormonal birth control if they do have a history of blood clotting disorders, uncontrolled hypertension, smoking, particularly if they’re over the age of 35, or a personal history or strong family history of breast cancer.

Dr. Jeffrey Mazlin:Non-hormonal contraceptives have the least amount of side effects.

Dr. Vanessa Parisi:Some patients just really just say, I want to feel like myself and I don’t want any interference from additives or any hormones.

Dr. Amy Brenner:Therefore, sometimes women want to discuss non-hormonal options.

Casey-Ann Collins:A non-hormonal birth control would be that that does not have any hormones. One example would be the intrauterine device, specifically the copper IUD, and that works by creating cervical mucus thickening and has a spermicidal effect.

Dr. Amy Brenner:Certainly condoms are an option, but sometimes women and men don’t like that as an option when they’re in a monogamous, long-term relationship. But that certainly is an option that’s non-hormonal.

Dr. Vanessa Parisi:There’s the female diaphragm.

Casey-Ann Collins:Another non-hormonal birth control option would be the birth control gel. And you would actually use this one hour prior to intercourse. And this also has a spermicidal effect.

Dr. Amy Brenner:And then there are some non-hormonal permanent options such as a tubal ligation or something called a bilateral salpingectomy.

Dr. Vanessa Parisi:There are some side effects to non-hormonal birth control as far as if you use a barrier method, the failure rate is higher than the hormonal-containing birth controls.

Dr. Jeffrey Mazlin:Between 10 and 20 women per 100 users per year can get pregnant on condoms or diaphragm.

Dr. Amy Brenner:The biggest reason why birth control fails is not actually because of the method, but actually because of patient compliance.

Casey-Ann Collins:This is why we try to make sure that patients are using the birth control as recommended. It’s important for my patients to be open and honest because we can overcome barriers to their birth control options. I can find the best option for them, and they’ll be happy and be consistent with that birth control.

2020 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. The content on Healthgrades does not provide medical advice. Always consult a medical provider for diagnosis and treatment. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced
or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use
of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement.

Birth Control Video Center

Last Updated: Apr 14, 2021 6: 19: 35 PM

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Finding the right birth control method can take a few tries, but with all the options available today, it’s important to keep trying until you land on what works for you.


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Elena:In health class in high school, we learned about several different options of birth control out there, and it was definitely a hot topic of discussion with my friends.

Taylor:I heard an awful lot of rumors about birth control making you gain weight, making you go crazy.

Emily:It was scary. There’s a lot of information out there, and anytime you have something done, there’s always the scary stories.

Elena:I remember telling my doctor that I was experiencing a lot of painful cramps, and they were really severe. They were getting in the way of my daily life.

Taylor:I had excruciating period symptoms, and I was put on pain medication that actually ended up making my life a little bit worse. It would make me throw up.

Elena:I decided to do take the advice of my doctor and go on the birth control pill, and that has been helpful since. My doctor did go over various side effects, and we decided that I would keep her posted if I was experiencing any of them.

Taylor:For about a six-month period, I would say my hormones were just getting used to adjusting on the pill. It did make my moods a little bit more intense.

Emily:I started taking birth control pills in my teens. Any of the pills would trigger really intense migraines with auras, And that was a no-no, especially knowing that it might give me a stroke. At that point, I was so irritated and annoyed with the pill that I just didn’t want to have anything at all, and natural family planning did not feel like an option for me. My doctor was the one who recommended I switch over to an IUD.

Taylor:I’d happened to get off the pill for a little while, I want to say it was about six to seven months. Of course, my period, I say, comes back with vengeance. So I knew that I needed to be back onto the pill to help my body and my day-to-day quality of life.

Elena:Various other options were also brought up to me by my doctor, but I decided that the pill was the least invasive option for me.

Emily:I’d like to think that my journey with birth control is unique, but I don’t think it is. I think a lot of women have trouble finding things that fit for them, but be patient and continue trying things out and experimenting until you find the right fit. Because at the end of the day, peace of mind is priceless.

2020 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. The content on Healthgrades does not provide medical advice. Always consult a medical provider for diagnosis and treatment. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced
or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use
of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement.

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5 facts about birth control