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Biden brands Putin a ‘killer’ and says he will pay for Russian interference in US election – live

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Biden brands Putin a ‘killer’ and says he will pay for Russian interference in US election – live

Summary

Here’s a recap of today:

Early Newspaper
  • Stella Keating, a teenager from Washington, appeared (virtually) before the Senate judiciary committee today in fortify of the sweeping Equality Act, that would ban discrimination against LGBTQ+ Americans. “Hello. I’m Stella. And I’m transgender,” she said. “I am here before you today, representing the a variety of of thousands of young individuals apt appreciate me who are supported and most popular by their family, chums, and communities across the country.”
  • The Home reauthorized the Violence Against Females Act, legislation that protects victims of sexual and domestic abuse, 244-172. Although the measure to reauthorize the 1994 law, which lapsed in 2018, purchased bipartisan fortify in the Home, it faces an uphill battle in the Senate, where Republicans oppose certain provisions, including these that provide protection to trans females.
  • Joe Biden said the Russian president Vladimir Putin “will pay a label” for his efforts to influence the 2020 election. “There’s places where it’s in our mutual interest to work together,” Biden said on True Morning America, noting the Start nuclear agreement – however said that there will be consequences for Russia’s efforts to influence the US elections.
  • Senate leader Chuck Schumer said he will introduce the “For The Other individuals Act” to present protection to voting rights. “Democracy reform ought to be a top priority of this Congress,” he said. The legislation is at threat of dash up against Republican opposition – and escalate debate around the filibuster, which allows parties to block legislation that does no longer meet a 60-vote threshold in the Senate.
  • California governor Gavin Newsom is gearing up for a recall challenge, along with his fiercest critics saying they’ve filed the requisite signatures wished to call an election to take away him from place of business. The Wednesday deadline to put up at least 1.5m valid voter signatures to trigger a gubernatorial recall has arrive two days before the anniversary of California’s first statewide shelter-in-place inform.

Updated

Joe Biden said the passage of the Violence Against Females Reauthorization Act “ought to no longer be a Democratic or Republican challenge”.

After the Home passed the legislation, he asked the Senate to carry out the same. “Growing proof shows that Covid-19 has easiest exacerbated the threat of intimate partner violence, creating a pandemic within a pandemic for infinite females at threat for abuse,” he said in a statement. “In short, that is an pressing crisis.”

Biden, while serving as a senator of Delaware, subsidized the 1994 iteration of the Violence Against Females Act, which has since been renewed several occasions, however lapsed in 2018.

“Writing and passing VAWA is one in every of the legislative accomplishments of which I’m most proud. VAWA has transformed the way our country responds to violence against females.” he said. “And, with each re-authorization, the Congress has expanded VAWA’s provisions on a bipartisan basis to enhance protections, including for Native American females and survivors from underserved communities, and enhance efforts to forestall intimate partner violence.

‘That hit dwelling for me’: Atlanta reeling after spa shootings of Asian Americans

Mike Jordan studies from Atlanta:

Christina Lee said her Vietnamese mother came to mind when she heard about the shootings at Aromatherapy Spa and Gold Spa in Atlanta on the night of 16 March.

“I’m thinking about my mother, who owned a nail salon at one point,” said Lee, a Georgia music and tradition journalist. “These are the kinds of businesses that speak in self perception these that are new to this country. And to learn that the victims had been Korean, that hit dwelling for me too because I’m half-Korean.”

In the area of Piedmont Avenue surrounding the two spas near Atlanta’s Midtown district, the sky was dreary as a consequence of looming thunderstorms, and the atmosphere was grim because of the killing of more than one Asian Americans the evening before in a shooting attack.

Spas in the rundown area, which has lengthy functioned as something of a pink-gentle district in Atlanta, locals instructed the Guardian, are landmarks of varieties.

Now not far from Aromatherapy is another spa, ST Jame Spa, and a few steps beyond is an adult nightclub called Membership Platinum.

There are clothing boutiques for irregular dancers and adult novelty shops pushing up against a latest progress of condominiums and fast casual restaurants. What was most noticeable on Wednesday had been hastily-erected tents for local media dodging rainfall, and the remaining strips of yellow crime scene tape.

Lee, who normally creates podcasts in an place of business near the two spas, however has no longer been working there during the pandemic, said the shootings here took her all of sudden, as the area is no longer known for a concentration of residents who determine with the Asian American or Pacific Island communities.

Nevertheless it was the overarching prejudice toward Asians in general, regardless of their origins, which she feels is growing, that she said was most alarming.

“It doesn’t matter if they’re from Wuhan or no longer. It by no means appears to matter,” she said, referring to the Chinese metropolis where the Covid-19 outbreak began.

“How is it conceivable that this wasn’t a hate crime. I don’t understand that logic, and I hope any individual will explain this to me,” she asked.

Read more:

Racist extremists pose most deadly terrorist threat to US, intelligence file warns

From Guardian staff and agencies:

Racially motivated extremists pose the most lethal domestic terrorism threats to the US, according to an unclassified intelligence file that warned that the threats may grow this year.

The blunt assessment, in a file released by the Place of job of the Director of National Intelligence, echoes warnings made by US officials, including the FBI director, Christopher Wray, who testified earlier this month that the threat from domestic violent extremism was “metastasizing” across the country.

Merrick Garland, the attorney general, has also described it as a top priority as his justice department works to prosecute a variety of of these that participated in the mob attack on the US Congress in January.

The insurrection laid bare the threat posed by domestic extremists and led Joe Biden to assign his intelligence officials the task of studying the scope of the issues. A temporary and unclassified summary of that threat assessment was made public Wednesday; a stout classified file was presented to the White Home and Congress.

“Today’s file underscores how we face the greatest threat from racially or ethnically motivated violent extremists, especially white supremacists, and militia violent extremists,” said the Democratic representative Adam Schiff of California, the chair of the Home intelligence committee.

Intelligence officials said in their assessment that extremists seen as risks for violence are motivated by a range of ideologies.

Read more:

The Home has renewed the Violence Against Females Act

The Home reauthorized the Violence Against Females Act, legislation that protects victims of sexual and domestic abuse, 244-172.

Although the measure to reauthorized the 1994 law, which lapsed in 2018, purchased bipartisan fortify in the Home, it faces an uphill battle in the Senate, where Republicans oppose certain provisions, including one to bar individuals with misdemeanor convictions of domestic abuse or stalking from buying guns. The bill also includes provisions to present protection to trans females’s access to females’s shelters and fair to attend sentences in females’s prisons, which some Republicans oppose.

Craig Caplan
(@CraigCaplan)

244-172: Home votes to reauthorize and update the Violence Against Females Act (VAWA), which expired two years ago. 29 Republicans joined all Democrats in voting Yes. Bill now heads to the Senate. pic.twitter.com/bxW2Jlxgjl

March 17, 2021

Georgia activists decry efforts to ram voting restrictions by means of legislature

Georgia activists held an emergency press conference Wednesday evening to decry an effort to sneak new voting changes into a pending bill.

The advocates said they had apt about an hours ogle to process a 93-page replace for a bill that was beforehand two pages. The new replace included many of the sweeping changes that already passed the Georgia Home – requiring ID information for absentee ballots, restrictions on early voting and absentee ballot dropboxes, among other measures – nevertheless it also introduced new restrictions.

Nonetheless there was significant new language in the bill authorizes any registered voter to bring an unlimited collection of challenges against another voter’s eligibility and requires local election boards to maintain hearings within 10 days. In December, ahead of the US Senate runoff election, the conservative neighborhood Correct the Vote announced efforts to bring challenges against 360,000 voters. A federal catch stopped the purge of 4,000 voters in one county.

The new bill also items new limits on how Georgia can count provisional ballots from a voter who shows as much as cast a ballot in the wrong precinct. A outdated Home bill would reject provisional ballots cast in the wrong precinct totally, the replace language would allow the ballots to be partially counted if they are cast after 5 p.m. and the voter signs a written statement saying they cannot accumulate to their fair polling place.

James Woodall, the chapter of the Georgia chapter of the NAACP, said the lack of transparency was “outrageous and immoral.” Helen Butler, an activist with the Georgia Coalition for the Other individuals’s Agenda, and Yvonne Brooks, of the AFL-CIO, said they had by no means seen anything similar in decades of closely following matters at the state capitol.

Georgia lawmakers have two more weeks to pass legislation and it’s nonetheless unclear which restrictions will ultimately be approved. Activists are also pressuring major corporations in Georgia to take a stand on the payments.

Updated

The Equality Act is geared toward protecting LGBTQ+ Americans, however its protections would also defend individuals of shade, non secular groups, females and immigrants, The 19th explains:


In June, the Supreme Court ruled that LGBTQ+ individuals may no longer be fired for their sexual orientation or gender identity, a ruling that the Trump administration disregarded and the Biden administration began enforcing via executive inform last week. Nonetheless in most states, it’s nonetheless legal to refuse to attend LGBTQ+ individuals in restaurants.

Nonetheless the Equality Act also would expand protections for groups already coated in the Civil Rights Act of 1964, said Sunu Chandy, legal director of the National Females’s Law Heart. That includes rights for individuals of shade, non secular groups, immigrants and females.

“I think the focal point was on what was at stake in that 2nd,” said Chandy of the 1964 law. “And now our principle of public accommodations and spaces is apt noteworthy broader.”

Chandy points out that the original law didn’t include discrimination in retail stores or taxis in its protections. The Equality Act would acquire these gaps. Chandy says that applies to “individuals who have particular non secular head coverings or are otherwise marked as being related to a minority non secular faith.”

“In the last four years, that kind of hate crime and really explicit discrimination has really increased in a way that’s appalling,” Chandy said. “We want to make certain that these rights are also enshrined in federal law, and no longer dependent on local law.

Read more here.

Updated

Stella Keating, a 16-year-outdated from Washington, testifies in Senate hearing on trans rights

Stella Keating, a teenager from Washington, appeared (virtually) before the Senate Judiciary Committee today in fortify of the sweeping Equality Act, that would ban discrimination against LGBTQ Americans.

“Hello. I’m Stella. And I’m transgender,” she said. “I am here before you today, representing the a variety of of thousands of young individuals apt appreciate me who are supported and most popular by their family, chums, and communities across the country.”

Human Rights Campaign
(@HRC)

“Hello, I’m Stella, and I’m transgender. I’m here before you today representing the a variety of of thousands of young individuals apt appreciate me who are supported and most popular by their family, chums and communities across the country.” pic.twitter.com/gFwqlATmTf

March 17, 2021

The Equality Act, which has broad fortify among Democrats. It passed the Home last month however faces an uphill battle in the Senate, where Republicans have staunchly adversarial it. Earlier to Keating’s speech at the Judiciary hearing, Republican senators including Chuck Grassley of Iowa misgendered and traditional transphobic language to listing trans girls. The bill will need 60 votes to accumulate by means of the Senate.

Here’s an explainer on the act from my colleague Sam Levin:


The bill amends existing civil rights laws to explicitly restrict discrimination based on gender identity and sexual orientation and affords clear legal protections for transgender and uncommon individuals in employment, housing, education, public accommodations, federally funded programs and other sectors.

The Equality Act builds on the landmark US supreme courtroom ruling last year prohibiting employment discrimination against LGBTQ+ workers. Biden has already issued executive orders to defend trans rights, undoing a few of Trump’s anti-LGBTQ+ policies and directing federal departments to follow the guidance of the supreme courtroom decision. Nonetheless advocates say the Equality Act is vital because it would enshrine protections into law beyond employment, and stop future administrations from rolling back anti-discrimination principles.

The act may be particularly significant for LGBTQ+ residents in the 27 states that carry out no longer have anti-discrimination laws on the books for trans and uncommon individuals, where it’s legal to disclaim them housing based on their identities.

“We shouldn’t nonetheless be having to fight for equal rights,” said Nic Talbott, a 27-year-outdated Ohio resident, who was forced to abandon his plans of joining the military as a consequence of Donald Trump’s ban on trans provider contributors instructed Sam last month “We ought to be able to circulate to work, find housing and apt live our lives with out having to fear about whether or no longer we’re going to be excluded apt for being transgender or gay.”

Read more background here:

California governor gears up for recall fight as critics say they’ve reached 2m signatures

Hello there, it’s Maanvi Singh – I’ll be bringing you politics updates for the following few hours. First up, an update from California:

Governor Gavin Newsom is gearing up for a recall challenge, along with his fiercest critics saying they’ve filed the requisite signatures wished to call an election to take away him from place of business.

The Wednesday deadline to put up at least 1.5m valid voter signatures to trigger a gubernatorial recall has arrive two days before the anniversary of California’s first statewide shelter-in-place inform. Counties now have till the stay of April to check petition signatures.

The recall campaign says it has nonetheless more than 2m signatures. “We’re laser-interested by playing this out day by day,” said Randy Economy, a senior advisor to the recall campaign. “Once we accumulate this on the ballot officially, the next phase of the campaign kicks off – and that is to gather fortify for the recall.”

The campaign, spearheaded by the Republican former sheriff’s deputy Orrin Heatlie, has arrive out against the Newsom’s administration’s pandemic-era lockdowns, aid to undocumented immigrants and homeless residents, relatively excessive taxes and spending on social programs. The effort has picked up financial fortify from substantial business donors and a few Silicon Valley venture capitalists, including the former Facebook executive Chamath Palihapitiya.

“Neatly, the reality is, it appears to be like appreciate it’s going on the ballot,” Newsom said Tuesday during a news conference. “We will fight it. We will defeat it.”

Read more here:

Updated

After six females of Asian descent and two others had been killed in attacks on massage parlors around Atlanta, Georgia, on Tuesday that local authorities have hesitated to label a hate crime, Joe Biden has called a surge of “brutality against Asian Americans” “troubling”.

Politico has this video from the Oval Place of job:

POLITICO
(@politico)

President Joe Biden acknowledged the concern expressed by the AAPI community.

“I have been speaking about the brutality against Asian-Americans, and or no longer it’s troubling,” Biden said today from the Oval Place of job. https://t.co/fODhw5efHd pic.twitter.com/3M7LNFKqVq

March 17, 2021

Victoria Bekiempis

Distribution of white supremacist propaganda nearly doubled across America in 2020, with 5,125 incidents of racist, antisemitic and other hateful messages being reported by an advocacy neighborhood.

The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) said Wednesday that 2020 had the “highest stage” of cases of such propaganda since it started monitoring the phenomenon – an average of about 14 cases daily. There had been 2,724 instances reported in 2019, ADL said.

Armed groups hold a rally in front of a closed Texas State Capitol in Austin, Texas, on January 17, 2021 during a nationwide protest called by anti-government and far-right groups supporting Donald Trump and his false claims of electoral fraud.

Armed groups maintain a rally in front of a closed Texas State Capitol in Austin, Texas, on January 17, 2021 during a nationwide exclaim called by anti-authorities and far-fair groups supporting Donald Trump and his false claims of electoral fraud. Photograph: Matthew Busch/AFP/Getty Images

The release of ADL’s file came hours after a gunman fatally shot eight individuals at several Atlanta-area massage parlors – six of the victims killed had been of Asian descent, and seven had been females – spurring fears the spree was racially motivated. The shootings had been carried out amid an increase in anti-Asian bigotry across the US, which has included harassment and physical attacks.

ADL’s Heart on Extremism monitored the dissemination of racist, antisemitic and anti-LGBTQ+ posters, banners, flyers and stickers by contributors of white supremacist and far-fair groups. A minimum of 30 “known white supremacist groups” had been accountable for the bigoted propaganda push, which affected 49 states last year.

Read the stout fragment:

Count California’s Senator Dianne Feinstein, apparently, on the listing of skeptics whose opposition to filibuster reform may undermine a few of the top legislative priorities of the Biden administration, starting with a bill to present protection to voting rights that majority leader Chuck Schumer announced today he would bring to the Senate floor:

Sahil Kapur
(@sahilkapur)

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-California) tells Capitol Hill pool she’s no longer but sold on nixing the filibuster, fretting that it may backfire on Democrats when GOP regains energy.

“I am involved. That is a factor,” she says. “Certainly one of the reasons why I’m hesitant.”

March 17, 2021

Separately Feinstein, 87, has arrive below rigidity to step aside before her present term ends in 2024 owing to what senior party officials have described in private as her “diminished acuity”. The Recent York Times’ Jonathan Martin reported Wednesday that Feinstein’s husband can be up for an ambassador put up in Europe, in a development that may potentially circulate her out of the senate. She dismissed that possibility when asked about it on Wednesday, nevertheless:

Manu Raju
(@mkraju)

And the 87-year-outdated veteran Democrat also said whatever happens with Blum would no longer affect her plans to attend out her term in stout.

“No,” she said when asked if she would leave the Senate early if her husband got the nod.

March 17, 2021

Two jurors dismissed in George Floyd cancel case

A catch on Wednesday dismissed two jurors who had been seated for the trial of a former Minneapolis police officer accused in George Floyd’s death over considerations they had been tainted by the metropolis’s announcement of a $27m settlement with Floyd’s family, the Associated Press studies:

Hennepin county catch Peter Cahill recalled seven jurors who had been seated before the settlement announcement last week, and puzzled each about what they knew of the settlement and whether it would affect their ability to attend. Former officer Derek Chauvin’s attorney, Eric Nelson, had requested the recall.

That 5 of the seven jurors said they had been able to shut out the news or situation it aside was a fairly appropriate final result for these that hope the trial will stay on the appropriate track, and may minimize the chance of Cahill agreeing to a defense inquire of to delay the trial.

Chauvin is charged with cancel and manslaughter in the 25 May death of Floyd, a Black man who was declared dead after Chauvin, who is white, pressed his knee against his neck for about nine minutes. Floyd’s death, captured on a broadly seen bystander video, trigger off weeks of generally violent protests across the country and resulted in a national reckoning on racial justice.

Cahill was careful to ask jurors if they had heard the news of the settlement with out giving details, saying easiest that there had been “intensive media coverage about trends in a civil swimsuit between the metropolis of Minneapolis and the family of George Floyd” and asking if they had been exposed to it.

The first dismissed juror, a white man in his 30s, said he had heard about the settlement. “I think it will be hard to be impartial,” he said.

Read further:

Joe Biden’s nominee to be US trade representative, Katherine Tai, has been confirmed in a unanimous 98-0 Senate vote. She is a former staff member of the Home Ways and Means committee, the highly efficient committee that drafts tax law.

Tai is the first woman of shade and the first Asian American to attend as trade representative. She succeeds Bob Lighthizer, who held the put up in the direction of the Trump administration.

Katherine C. Tai addresses the Senate Finance committee hearings to examine her nomination to be United States Trade Representative in February.

Katherine C. Tai addresses the Senate Finance committee hearings to examine her nomination to be United States Trade Representative in February. Photograph: Reuters

Centrist Democrat Joe Manchin, whose vote would almost absolutely be wished to advance filibuster reform in the US senate, has said he opposes a “carve-out” that would ban the train of the filibuster on voting rights legislation.

Manu Raju
(@mkraju)

Recent — Manchin rejects calls for lowering 60-vote threshold. Also rejects calls for requiring 41 sens to sustain filibuster. Also rejects calls for particular carveouts on legislation, appreciate on voting

I asked him if he’s drawing a line at 60

“I’m nonetheless at 60 .. I haven’t changed.”

March 17, 2021

Former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams called on Sunday for such a carve-out, telling CNN, “Safety of democracy is so fundamental that it will be exempt from the filibuster principles.”

Many Democratic senators have taken up that call:

Amy Klobuchar
(@amyklobuchar)

I’m no longer going to let an antiquated Senate rule undermine the foundation of our democracy. You cannot filibuster Americans’ fair to vote.

March 10, 2021

Nonetheless Joe Biden has stopped in need of calling for a filibuster carve-out for voting rights, calling for filibuster reform that would require senators to physically maintain the floor in inform to block a vote on legislation.

Manchin, the West Virginia Democrat, has likewise instantaneous that he would fortify new principles requiring senators to maintain the floor during a filibuster.

Nonetheless Manchin explicitly opposes the voting rights carve-out, comparing such a compromise measure as “appreciate being a minute bit pregnant”:

Burgess Everett
(@burgessev)

Manchin on a filibuster carve out for a particular bill appreciate HR 1: “no. No. No. That’s appreciate being a minute bit pregnant maybe”

March 17, 2021

Read further:

Updated

A lawyer for Charlotte Bennett, one in every of the females to have accused Recent York governor Andrew Cuomo of sexual harassment, alleges an “unacceptable battle of interest” on the part of a law agency selected by the speaker of the state assembly to help in the Cuomo investigation.

A longtime partner in the agency was beforehand appointed by Cuomo to the board of a State College of Recent York branch.

State attorney general Letitia James has selected other initiate air prosecutors to assist in the investigation of Cuomo on separate allegations of sexual misconduct and of an alleged quilt-up of nursing dwelling Covid deaths.

Zack Fink
(@ZackFinkNews)

Statement from @DebraKatzKMB, Attorney for @_char_bennett_ on @CarlHeastie hiring @DavisPolkReg for impeachment investigation into @NYGovCuomo pic.twitter.com/wkdOCMgGsB

March 17, 2021

Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP

Representative Debbie Dingell of Michigan calls on Congress to reauthorize the Violence Against Females Act, which the Home is scheduled to vote on today.

She shares a wrenching personal expertise from her childhood dwelling (trigger warning for domestic violence).

“It is time that this bill be reauthorized,” Dingell says.

ABC News Politics
(@ABCPolitics)

WATCH: Bag. Debbie Dingell tells her expertise with domestic violence and passionately advocates for Congress to pass the Violence Against Females Act. pic.twitter.com/jKzW3a22En

March 17, 2021

Schumer to bring voting rights bill to Senate floor

Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer has announced he will bring voting rights legislation passed in the Home of Representatives to the floor of the US senate.

The circulate is incredibly at threat of suggested Republicans to lean on the filibuster rule to block a vote on the legislation – which in flip is at threat of escalate the battle in latest days over the filibuster from a war of phrases into a Senate floor showdown in which Democrats may strike the rule down.

Sahil Kapur
(@sahilkapur)

👀 Chuck Schumer apt said he will build S.1, the “For The Other individuals Act” on the Senate floor: “Democracy reform ought to be a top priority of this Congress.”

Here is going to explode the filibuster war when it gets blocked. pic.twitter.com/PEnU1kU7Yk

March 17, 2021

Updated

Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms places the massage parlor killings in context of a national wave of attacks on Asian Americans during the pandemic.

“It is unacceptable,” she says. “It is hateful. And it has to forestall.”

USA TODAY
(@USATODAY)

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said: “We all know that many of the victims, the majority of the victims, had been Asian. We also know that that is an challenge that is happening across the country. It is unacceptable. It is hateful. And it has to forestall.” pic.twitter.com/rYhHQXVVvs

March 17, 2021

Offer:
Biden brands Putin a ‘killer’ and says he will pay for Russian interference in US election – live