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Kathy Hochul vows to change ‘toxic’ environment as Original York’s next governor – live

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Kathy Hochul vows to change ‘toxic’ environment as Original York’s next governor – live

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Politics recap

  • Kathy Hochul pledged to reform the “toxic” work environment within the Original York governor’s arrangement of work as Andrew Cuomo prepares to step down. The lieutenant governor promised that her administration would not embody someone named within the Original York attorney total’s record for having engaged in unethical conduct. “There’ll be turnover,” Hochul acknowledged at a press conference. “At the tip of my length of time, each time it ends, no one will ever teach my administration as a toxic work environment.”
  • Senator Joe Manchin voiced “severe concerns” about Democrats’ $3.5tn spending package deal, after the Senate favorite a blueprint for the invoice in a 50-49 obtain together-line vote. “Given the original speak of the economic recovery, it’s simply irresponsible to proceed spending at ranges extra suited to acknowledge to a Unprecedented Despair or Unprecedented Recession – not an economy that is on the verge of overheating,” Manchin acknowledged in a assertion.
  • Senate majority chief Chuck Schumer acknowledged “the hardest work is but to come” on the spending package deal. Schumer is attempting to pass the invoice by reconciliation in an evenly divided Senate, that procedure he cannot manage to pay for a single defection within the Democratic caucus. Each Manchin and fellow Democrat Kyrsten Sinema get now expressed criticism of the invoice’s price.
  • The Centers for Disease Shield watch over and Prevention urged all pregnant ladies to obtain vaccinated against coronavirus. The CDC famed that a knowledge diagnosis indicated no increased probability of miscarriage amongst vaccinated ladies. As of now, handiest about 23% of pregnant ladies get got at least one vaccine dose.
  • The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is probably going to authorize a Covid-19 vaccine booster for immunocompromised of us, per extra than one stories.The company would amend the emergency employ authorizations for the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines, NBC and CNN reported.

  • California grew to turn into the first US speak to place a vaccine mandate for academics and other school workers. California governor Gavin Newsom announced today that every indubitably one of the most speak’s academics shall be required to demonstrate proof of vaccination or submit to weekly coronavirus checks.
  • Julian Assange lost a courtroom battle to stop the US from expanding the grounds for its enchantment in his extradition case. The US authorities is attempting to overturn a earlier ruling preventing the extradition of Assange, the founding father of WikiLeaks, to face prices of espionage and hacking authorities computers.
  • Dwelling Democrats will have the chance to obtain admission to Donald Trump’s financial files from 2017 and 2018, a federal select ruled – granting lawmakers investigating the feeble president restricted obtain admission to to the documents they want. The Dwelling oversight committee wished financial files relationship from 2011 by 2018, but select Amit Mehta argued that “the extra Congress can invade the deepest sphere of a feeble president, the greater the leverage Congress would get on a sitting president”.

– Joan E Greve and Maanvi Singh

Updated

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is probably going to authorize a Covid-19 vaccine booster for immunocompromised of us, per extra than one stories.

The company would amend the emergency employ authorizations for the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines, NBC and CNN reported.

“The FDA is carefully monitoring knowledge as it becomes accessible from learn administering a further dose of the licensed Covid-19 vaccines to immunocompromised folks,” the FDA acknowledged in a assertion. “The company, together with the CDC, is evaluating doable ideas on this grief, and will fraction knowledge within the stop to future.”

Meanwhile, the World Health Organization referred to as for a moratorium on coronavirus vaccine boosters till the tip of September, so affords shall be directed toward serving to all nations vaccinate their most susceptible.

“I realize the grief of all governments to give protection to their of us from the Delta variant,” Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the Who director-total, acknowledged. “But we isn’t very going to – and we’d well easy not – settle for nations which get already outmoded most of the world offer of vaccines the utilization of even extra of it, while the sector’s most susceptible of us stay unprotected.”

Updated

Afghan authorities would possibly well tumble to Taliban in 90 days, bid US officials

Akhtar Mohammad Makoii in Herat, Peter Beaumont and Julian Borger in Washington record:

US officials get warned that Afghanistan’s authorities would possibly well tumble in 90 days, with Kabul isolated in as minute as a month, as the Taliban overran the central Sarposa detention heart in Kandahar, the nation’s second good metropolis, releasing practically 1,000 prisoners.

The tumble of Kandahar – regularly referred to as the capital of the south – would possibly well be a devastating blow for the Afghan authorities after a week in which the Taliban get swept up provincial capitals around the nation in a lightning offensive.

The most up-to-date setback for Afghan authorities forces got here as Joe Biden urged Afghan leaders to “battle for his or her nation” after speedy advances by the Taliban.

The White Dwelling spokesperson, Jen Psaki, repeated the administration line on Wednesday, asserting: “They’ve what they want. What they want to resolve is whether or not they get got the political will to battle assist, and within the occasion that they get got got the facility to unite as leaders to battle assist.”

She added: “We can proceed to provide stop air enhance. We’ll proceed to resupply their forces with meals and equipment, and pay all their salaries.”

Asked whether US air enhance for Afghan forces would stop on 31 August, the formal stop to the US battle in Afghanistan, she acknowledged: “I don’t get any update on that.” But she famed: “It’s a correct demand.”

With international embassies in Kabul, together with the US embassy, discreetly accelerating evacuation planning within the tournament of the converse worsening, the Taliban’s succession of victories on the battlefield has caught out western capitals which get prolonged sustained the Afghan authorities.

Read extra:

Maya Yang stories:

Rudy Giuliani, the staunch ally of Donald Trump who’s facing a multi-million buck defamation lawsuit connected to his attempts to undermine the US presidential elections, has embraced a original doable incomes trip.

Data superhighway users, would possibly well easy they be impressed to produce so, can now employ customized video messages from Giuliani, who has joined Cameo, a provider that sells personalized videos recorded by celebrities.

“Hello. It’s Rudy Giuliani and I’m on Cameo” Giuliani says in a video posted on his Cameo online page on Tuesday.

He goes on to bid: “If there might be an grief you want to focus on or a story you’d fancy to hear or fraction with me or a greeting that I will be able to bring to someone that would possibly well bring happiness to their day, I would possibly well be contented to produce it. It is going to also be organized. We can pronounce by the magic of Cameo.”

The price? That starts at $199 (£140).

Giuliani’s Cameo profile lists him as the “Ragged Associate Attorney Customary of the US, Mayor of Original York City 1994-2001, and Host of the Rudy Giuliani Basic Sense podcast.”

On 24 June, the feeble attorney for President Trump was suspended from practising law in Original York over his efforts in main Trump’s campaign to overturn the 2020 election results. His law license in Washington DC was suspended quickly after.

Giuliani can be facing a $1.3bn defamation lawsuit from Dominion Balloting Programs. The corporate has accused him of getting “manufactured and disseminated” a conspiracy theory connected to the company’s vote casting machines.

The Guardian stare on Biden’s bipartisan invoice: one battle obtained, many extra to proceed

From the Guardian Editorial Board:

On Tuesday, 19 Republican senators, together with minority chief Mitch McConnell, joined with Democrats to pass Joe Biden’s $550bn infrastructure invoice. In a polarised age, this act of bipartisan politics appears to be like miraculous. To vote for the invoice, Senate Republicans had to proceed against the wants of Donald Trump, who had warned against handing Mr Biden a victory prior to midterm polls in 2022. They also U-grew to turn into on a core Republican principle: that deepest funding is superior to authorities intervention.

Yet the Republicans’ vote was rooted in self-pastime. Simplest four will face the voters next year and the spending was usual, even with Republicans. Crucially Mr McConnell had protected the filibuster. Unless Republicans relented, Mr Biden will get done away with legislative tool that preserves the Senate’s 60-vote threshold for legislative success. As a substitute Mr Biden thanked his opponents for his or her courage in backing his proposal. This moment represents a check of Biden’s faith that Congress, and democracy, can easy work and obtain issues done.

In many ways this appears to be like fancy a defining battle for the heart and soul of the Democratic obtain together. The infrastructure invoice now goes to the Dwelling of Representatives, which has a Democratic majority and a greater revolutionary bloc. The Dwelling Democratic management has acknowledged it’s going to handiest circulate after the Senate passes a $3.5tn spending invoice to lower poverty, toughen aged and childcare as correctly as give protection to the environment. The good expansion of the US’s social security pick up since the Unprecedented Society of the 1960s is obligatory to assist flatten the inequalities wrought by decades of pro-market policies. The same will also be acknowledged for rolling assist the tax cuts for corporations and properly to build households that had been Mr Trump’s signature legislative achievement.

Read extra:

Dwelling Democrats will have the chance to obtain admission to Donald Trump’s financial files from 2017 and 2018, a federal select ruled – granting lawmakers investigating the feeble president restricted obtain admission to to the documents they want.

US district select Amit Mehta, who had previously ruled that the Democrats will get a massive array of files, ruled that they would possibly well subpoena two years’ price of files after a supreme courtroom ruling that Congress would possibly well easy ideas the separation of powers when looking for deepest knowledge in regards to the president. The Dwelling oversight committee wished financial files relationship from 2011 by 2018, but Mehta argued that “the extra Congress can invade the deepest sphere of a feeble president, the greater the leverage Congress would get on a sitting president”.

Mehta acknowledged Dwelling oversight Dems would possibly well also obtain admission to knowledge connected to Trump’s lease of a building in DC.

“Today’s district courtroom thought recognized that the oversight committee is entitled to a massive arrangement of President Trump’s financial files as phase of our severe investigation geared toward preventing presidential conflicts of pastime, self-dealing, and constitutional violations,” acknowledged Carolyn Maloney, Dwelling oversight chair, in a assertion. “While it’s disappointing that the courtroom, despite discovering that your total subpoena served legit legislative functions, narrowed the subpoena in some respects, the committee is actively all in favour of next steps.”

Updated

US workers lose out as astronomical chicken gets greater

The tight grip that The US’s good meat processing company has on the chicken trade has generated dire penalties for its workers, farmers and the environment in indubitably one of the most US’s main poultry-producing states, an investigation has chanced on.

Tyson Meals is ranked 73rd on the Fortune 500 list, with a revenue of $43bn within the last fiscal year.

Tyson accounts for the single good fraction of chicken vegetation at some point soon of the US, processing 2.3 billion birds in 2020. The corporate affords burgers and nuggets, amongst other chicken products, to chains together with Walmart, McDonalds, KFC and Taco Bell, as correctly as colleges and prisons.

In Arkansas, the establish the multinational is headquartered, the company currently accounts for an estimated two-thirds of processed poultry gross sales, a joint investigation by the Guardian and the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) displays.

Its stop to monopoly in Arkansas, which reflects nationwide and world traits within the meat trade, has been built over the past three decades by exploiting weakened antitrust regulations to develop dozens of smaller corporations and facilities.

Our findings imply that this vitality has been outmoded to dictate contracts and erode prerequisites for farmers and workers in vegetation in Arkansas, the establish it’s miles the third-good employer.

Tyson and the opposite three top corporations management about 87% of poultry manufacturing within the speak. Economists and meals justice advocates largely agree that patrons, farmers, workers, diminutive corporations and the planet lose out if the top four corporations management 40% or extra of any market. One grassroots labor organizer told the Guardian: “Right here is company The US and it’s failed the of us.”

The five-month investigation is based on learn and diagnosis of the most unprejudiced nowadays accessible economic, authorities and trade knowledge, and interviews with labor and farming advocates as correctly as recent and feeble workers at three Tyson vegetation.

Read extra:

Updated

Today to date

That’s it from me today. My west coast colleague, Maanvi Singh, will select over the weblog for the next few hours.

Right here’s the establish the day stands to date:

  • Kathy Hochul pledged to reform the “toxic” work environment within the Original York governor’s arrangement of work as Andrew Cuomo prepares to step down. The lieutenant governor promised that her administration would not embody someone named within the Original York attorney total’s record for having engaged in unethical conduct. “There’ll be turnover,” Hochul acknowledged at a press conference. “At the tip of my length of time, each time it ends, no one will ever teach my administration as a toxic work environment.”
  • Senator Joe Manchin voiced “severe concerns” about Democrats’ $3.5tn spending package deal, after the Senate favorite a blueprint for the invoice in a 50-49 obtain together-line vote. “Given the original speak of the economic recovery, it’s simply irresponsible to proceed spending at ranges extra suited to acknowledge to a Unprecedented Despair or Unprecedented Recession – not an economy that is on the verge of overheating,” Manchin acknowledged in a assertion.
  • Senate majority chief Chuck Schumer acknowledged “the hardest work is but to come” on the spending package deal. Schumer is attempting to pass the invoice by reconciliation in an evenly divided Senate, that procedure he cannot manage to pay for a single defection within the Democratic caucus. Each Manchin and fellow Democrat Kyrsten Sinema get now expressed criticism of the invoice’s price.
  • The Centers for Disease Shield watch over and Prevention urged all pregnant ladies to obtain vaccinated against coronavirus. The CDC famed that a knowledge diagnosis indicated no increased probability of miscarriage amongst vaccinated ladies. As of now, handiest about 23% of pregnant ladies get got at least one vaccine dose.
  • California grew to turn into the first US speak to place a vaccine mandate for academics and other school workers. California governor Gavin Newsom announced today that every indubitably one of the most speak’s academics shall be required to demonstrate proof of vaccination or submit to weekly coronavirus checks.
  • Julian Assange lost a courtroom battle to stop the US from expanding the grounds for its enchantment in his extradition case. The US authorities is attempting to overturn a earlier ruling preventing the extradition of Assange, the founding father of WikiLeaks, to face prices of espionage and hacking authorities computers.

Maanvi can get extra coming up, so preserve tuned.

After delivering ready remarks at his virtual meeting with mayors and governors, Joe Biden was asked whether he’s infected by raising the debt ceiling.

“Nope. They don’t seem to be going to enable us to default,” Biden acknowledged, referring to Senate Republicans. “Eight trillion of that is on the Republicans’ look.”

JM Rieger
(@RiegerReport)

REPORTER: Are you anxious in regards to the debt ceiling, Mr. President?

BIDEN: Nope. They’re not going to enable us to default. $8 billion— $8 trillion of that is on the Republican’s look. pic.twitter.com/tevIBdZWFL

August 11, 2021

Obviously, Senate Republicans get given every indication that they get got got no pastime in serving to Democrats raise the debt ceiling. If the debt ceiling isn’t very raised, the US shall be in a arrangement of being unable to pay its payments, causing massive market disruption.

Senate minority chief Mitch McConnell had referred to as on Democrats to embody a debt ceiling increase of their $3.5tn spending package deal, but majority chief Chuck Schumer has insisted that the chamber work in a bipartisan fashion to raise the debt ceiling, as senators regularly did at some point soon of Donald Trump’s presidency.

Senate Democrats will want 10 Republican votes to raise the debt ceiling, and now 46 Republican senators get signed a letter indicating they obtained’t enhance a debt ceiling increase.

“As a outcome of Democrats are guilty for the spending, they want to select accountability for increasing the debt ceiling,” the Republicans acknowledged of their letter.

So the Senate is at an impasse, and if truth be told your total US economy hangs within the steadiness as the 2 parties squabble. Only one other usual day in Washington.

Erin McCormick stories for the Guardian from Berkeley:

Medical suppliers and pharmacies within the California Bay Scheme are scrambling to assist up with the newly-increased demand of for Covid-19 checking out, as cases of the virus surge fueled by the highly-contagious Delta variant.

At one CVS pharmacy in Richmond on Tuesday, a signal taped to the front door announced “Fast Covid checks mercurial purchased out”. At a correctly being facility within the metropolis the establish the drive-by Covid checking out hassle had unprejudiced nowadays been taken down, a line of stroll-in patients looking for checks stretched down the block in front of the correctly being facility. And in San Francisco last week, the outmoded scene of lines of automobiles with passengers inner waiting to be tested was assist at the metropolis’s drive by check hassle.

The preference of patients looking for Covid-19 checks in California has greater than doubled from a month ago, when case counts had been at their lowest point this year, in accordance to speak statistics. As of 10 August, about 200,000 patients per day had been getting checks within the speak, when in contrast to 81,000 per day at the initiating of July. The checking out totals had been greater than most factors within the pandemic, but easy lower than last wintry climate’s surge.

The upsurge in demand of for checks isn’t very lawful driven by unvaccinated American citizens who’re at most probability for severe Covid, but by vaccinated residents infected by usually milder “leap forward” cases. Original learn get proven that these cases, while extraordinarily not really to stop in hospitalization or death, produce get some doable to unfold the virus.

California becomes first US speak to place vaccine mandate for academics

California will now require all of the speak’s academics and other school workers to obtain vaccinated or salvage weekly coronavirus checks, governor Gavin Newsom announced today.

The announcement makes California the first speak within the US to place a vaccine mandate for academics, as colleges ogle to reopen in person for the autumn.

Bloomberg Quicktake
(@Quicktake)

California has turn into the first speak within the U.S. to mandate Covid vaccines or customary checking out for all academics and public school workers, Newsom announced Wednesday https://t.co/jsfO2BNz9X pic.twitter.com/Fk41mswKMD

August 11, 2021

“We specialise in here is the factual thing to produce and we specialise in here’s a sustainable skill to holding our colleges open and to tackle the #1 fear that of us fancy myself get for younger kids,” Newsom acknowledged.

“And that’s shimmering that colleges are doing all the pieces of their vitality to assist our kids safe, to assist our kids healthy, and that’s what we’re doing here within the speak of California.

The news comes amid a surge in coronavirus cases amongst unvaccinated American citizens caused by the Delta variant, which has intensified concerns about school reopenings.

The Democratic governor announced the original policy at a San Francisco Bay Scheme school that has already reopened for its tumble semester.

Newsom had previously established identical vaccine mandates for speak authorities workers and speak healthcare workers.

Joe Biden is now maintaining a virtual meeting with governors, mayors and other speak, local and tribal officials to pitch the bipartisan infrastructure invoice, which passed the Senate the day past.

The president acknowledged the Senate’s passage of the invoice, which would possibly well invest $550bn in original federal funds for roads, bridges and other bodily infrastructure tasks, demonstrated how a democracy can pause substantive change for its voters.

Patsy Widakuswara
(@pwidakuswara)

Biden meets virtually with governors, mayors, and other speak, local, and tribal officials to pronounce up the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act.

He acknowledged it’s going to assist ease the years of gridlock in Washington and demonstrate the American of us who their gov can & will work for them. pic.twitter.com/utuJwLxFXo

August 11, 2021

The Senate passed the legislation in a 69-30 vote the day past, with 19 Republicans becoming a member of all 50 Democrats to obtain the legislation at some point soon of the attain line.

Nevertheless, the invoice easy wants to pass the Dwelling, the establish it would possibly well face resistance from revolutionary lawmakers. Some Dwelling progressives get indicated they obtained’t enhance the invoice unless they salvage assurances in regards to the last passage of the $3.5tn spending package deal, which the Senate superior this morning.

At least two Senate Democrats get already suggested the price price for the last version of the spending package deal will want to be diminished, frustrating progressives who already stare the $3.5tn resolve as a compromise.

Joel Wertheimer, a civil rights attorney and a feeble associate workers secretary for Barack Obama, argues that the toxic work environment in Andrew Cuomo’s arrangement of work was inextricably linked to his other screw ups as governor.

Wetheimer writes in an op-ed for the Guardian:


Launch up with the preference of ladies whose careers had been prick immediate and harmed by the governor’s actions. That left Original York without the contributions of many ladies who will get made the speak a greater arrangement but who left due to the abuse. And who’re the ladies who didn’t obtain jobs within the authorities at all because Cuomo would possibly well not get chanced on them shining? What was their contribution to our collective wellbeing that was neglected? It is not likely to get worked for the governor and not get seen that the senior ladies who worked at the moment for him predominantly looked alike and particularly none of them the establish non-white. …

The mind drain as a outcome of his toxic administration ache Original York. I made it seven months within the Cuomo administration in 2017. I was attempting to pick up a original job after two months. But working in an abusive and chaotic environment the establish no one cared about policy outcomes was not price proximity to vitality. The employees usually justified what they went by as obligatory for correct governance, but I knew otherwise, having lawful come from the Obama White Dwelling, the establish working prolonged hours was the norm, but so was kindness coming from the top. …

Andrew Cuomo is long past. But there shall be extra politicians who’re acknowledged to sexually harass their workers and bustle toxic work environments. We would possibly well easy endure in ideas that the harms produce not stop at the ladies they harass or the staffers they abuse, despite the indisputable fact that that ought to be ample. The abuse is corrosive, the harms leak out at some point soon of the authorities, and we’re all worse for it.

Kathy Hochul indicated she has not but spoken to Joe Biden, despite the indisputable fact that the president tried to give her a call while she was on a flight and thus unavailable.

The White Dwelling press secretary, Jen Psaki, acknowledged this afternoon that Biden plans to pronounce to Hochul “within the upcoming days”, prior to she takes over as governor of Original York later this month.

Asked what Biden’s message to Hochul shall be, Psaki acknowledged, “He would deliver to her: ‘I’m attempting forward to working with you … to proceed to obtain the pandemic below management, to build the of us of Original York assist to work, and to circulate forward as federal and speak companions.’”

Biden had referred to as for Andrew Cuomo to resign last week, after the Original York attorney total released its record asserting the governor had sexually harassed at least 11 ladies, and the president welcomed the announcement of Cuomo’s departure the day past.

Kathy Hochul acknowledged that she was not pleased with the 2-week transition length prior to Andrew Cuomo steps down and she becomes governor of Original York.

“It’s not what I asked for,” the lieutenant governor acknowledged. “Nevertheless, I’m attempting forward to a fragile transition, which he promised.”

CSPAN
(@cspan)

Original York Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul (@LtGovHochulNY) on 14 day transition length: “Or not it’s miles not what I asked for, alternatively, I’m attempting forward to a fragile transition, which he promised.”

Fat video here: https://t.co/jJOgQ97gqc pic.twitter.com/VkqhThfdSj

August 11, 2021

Hochul acknowledged Cuomo had told her that he believed the 2-week transition was “obligatory” to produce sure continuity of authorities and enable her to meet with other senior officials within the speak.

“I’m ready to select arrangement of work, as any lieutenant governor is, from the very first hour you’re sworn in,” Hochul acknowledged. “Nevertheless, I could select advantage of that time and to proceed to preserve with the of us of the speak of Original York. I if truth be told get a imaginative and prescient, but I’m going to proceed to obtain that.”

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Kathy Hochul vows to change ‘toxic’ environment as Original York’s next governor – live