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Today’s coronavirus news: Most Canadians confident vaccine rollout is back on track: ballot; International air travel a fraction of pre-pandemic instances; AstraZeneca vaccine needs better promotion, expert

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Today’s coronavirus news: Most Canadians confident vaccine rollout is back on track: ballot; International air travel a fraction of pre-pandemic instances; AstraZeneca vaccine needs better promotion, expert

KEY FACTS

  • 7: 26 a.m. Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine for COVID-19 needs better promotion: experts

    Early Newspaper
  • 7: 15 a.m. Millions of Ontarians will be getting COVID-19 pictures sooner than anticipated.

The latest coronavirus news from Canada and around the arena Tuesday. This file will be updated for the duration of the day. Web links to longer tales if available.

9: 20 a.m. A Biden administration official says drugmaker Merck will assist fabricate rival Johnson & Johnson’s newly-approved coronavirus vaccine.

The official spoke Tuesday on the condition of anonymity ahead of an official announcement.

The announcement comes as the White Home looks to be to pace the production of the one-dose vaccine. Officials have said J&J faced unexpected production issues with its vaccine and only produced 3.9 million doses ahead of its receiving emergency consume authorization on Saturday. The company says it is on pace to carry 100 million doses by the finish of June.

The assistance from Merck was anticipated to assist J&J meet its production commitments and expand present even additional.

President Joe Biden is blueprint to focus on the development in a speech Tuesday afternoon.

8: 42 a.m. The Canadian economy posted its worst displaying on file in 2020 as the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the country shutting down companies and placing folks out of work.

Statistics Canada says real immoral domestic product shrank 5.4 per cent in 2020, the steepest annual decline since quarterly data had been first recorded in 1961.

8: 20 a.m. St. James Catholic Elementary Faculty in Vaughan reported one extra case of COVID-19 on Monday and is now closed till March 8.

It has two confirmed cases and two classrooms had been previously closed.

It is the second faculty that has been closed as a consequence of COVID-19 after York Catholic District Faculty Board’s reopening.

Two diverse faculty cases advance from YCDSB, as St. Emily Catholic Elementary Faculty and St. Mary of the Angels Catholic Elementary Faculty each have one unusual case and one closed classroom.

In York Region District Faculty Board, 17 faculties are reporting 23 unusual cases.

Five Markham faculties have unusual cases of COVID-19.

Ashton Meadows Public Faculty and Buttonville Public Faculty each relate a unusual case of COVID-19, while Coppard Glen Public Faculty reports two unusual cases.

Lincoln Alexander Public Faculty has one unusual case and three confirmed cases in total, which is the same as Stonebridge Public Faculty.

Eight faculties in Vaughan have unusual cases of COVID-19.

Blue Willow Public Faculty and Mackenzie Glen Public Faculty each have a unusual case.

7: 50 a.m. Take one excessive-finish restaurant group. Add a supply carrier from a grocery retailer. Shake it up with a global pandemic.

Within the occasion you’re Sobeys and Oliver & Bonacini, you’re hoping that’s a recipe for trade success.

The two companies are unveiling a unusual online-only offering Thursday that will allow consumers to command high dishes from Oliver & Bonacini restaurants such as Bannock and Maison Selby, thru the Voilà by Sobeys supply carrier.

Initially, there will be four frozen merchandise available, all of them prepared in a Sobeys commissary kitchen staffed by Oliver & Bonacini, though O & B Hospitality Neighborhood CEO Andrew Oliver said the offerings may expand.

The primary four merchandise, the tourtière from Bannock Restaurant, piri piri chicken from Lena, French onion soup from Maison Selby, and O & B’s bestselling chicken pot pie, are all dishes that easily withstand the freezing and reheating job, Oliver said.

Read the corpulent anecdote from the Star’s Josh Rubin

7: 40 a.m. A COVID-19 outbreak spirited a variant of concern has forced the closure of a Scarborough elementary faculty — believed to be the primary faculty closure since in-person classes resumed last month.

Toronto Public Health announced Monday that six folks at Donwood Park Public Faculty, near Midland Ave. and Lawrence Ave. E., have been contaminated, along with four who have screened clear for a variant of concern. In four of the cases, neighborhood publicity is “probably,” the health unit said in a news release.

A variant of concern is a mutation of SARS-CoV-2 — the virus that causes COVID-19 — that is believed to be extra contagious. Toronto Public Health failed to specify which variant has been linked to the faculty.

Public health officials instantaneous the faculty be closed as a “precautionary measure” so they may total an investigation. They said they have followed up with cease contacts of those contaminated and instantaneous attempting out on your whole faculty. Families of college students and teachers are also being encouraged to accept examined.

Read the corpulent anecdote from the Star’s Brendan Kennedy

7: 26 a.m. Essential staff who are extra prone to contract and transmit COVID-19 needs to be prioritized for immunization with the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine now that a national panel is now not recommending it for seniors, two experts say.

Caroline Colijn, a COVID-19 modeller and mathematician at Simon Fraser College, and Horacio Bach, an adjunct professor in the division of infectious diseases at the College of British Columbia, also say the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine will be better promoted by provincial health officials as a strong contender to the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines.

The National Advisory Committee on Immunization has instantaneous that the Oxford-AstraZeneca now not be frail for folks 65 and over as a consequence of concern about restricted data on how this may work in older populations, even after Health Canada authorized its consume last week for all adults.

Oxford-AstraZeneca reported about 62 per cent effectiveness at struggling with COVID-19 while Pifzer-BioNTech and Moderna have said the efficacy of their vaccines is about 95 per cent.

Colijn and Bach say the fact that there have been no hospitalizations from severe illness and no deaths among those the usage of Oxford-AstraZeneca needs to be underscored because folks awaiting immunization appear to be fixated on the greater efficacy data for the primary two vaccines approved in Canada.

7: 15 a.m. Millions of Ontarians will be getting COVID-19 pictures sooner than anticipated.

Less than a week after saying folks beneath age 60 wouldn’t be vaccinated till sometime this summer, the province said Monday it may delay second doses of Pfizer and Moderna vaccines for as long as four months to pace up a plan that has been criticized as too gradual.

“Our govt is keenly drawn to doing all the issues that you can reflect of to accept as many vaccines into arms as hastily as that you can reflect of,” Health Minister Christine Elliott and Solicitor General Sylvia Jones said in a statement Monday.

The province is awaiting “direction” from the federal govt and the National Advisory Committee on Immunization on intervals for second doses following moves by British Columbia’s health officer.

Read the corpulent anecdote from the Star’s Pick Ferguson

6: 03 a.m.: Sixty-four per cent of downtown Toronto staff say they feel safe going to their workplace in the core, according to unusual research being released this week by the Toronto Region Board of Trade.

Then again, the Nanos gape suggests it’s going to take a lot of thought and communication to maintain that comfort and to quell the anxieties of the 15 per cent of downtown staff who said they had been uncomfortable returning and the remaining 21 per cent who indicated they had been neutral or uncertain.

Among those with reservations, 56 per cent cited COVID-19 as their chief concern. Fifteen per cent advised they paralyzed about crowding and 12 per cent had fears around commuting.

The research comes out of a committee on downtown recovery headed by Toronto Mayor John Tory, the board of trade, the Urban Land Institute of Toronto and the Financial District Trade Enchancment Area.

Read the corpulent anecdote from the Star’s Tess Kalinowski.

5: 57 a.m.: Democrats’ hopes of along with a minimum-wage increase in their $1.9 trillion COVID-19 reduction invoice appeared all but dead Monday as the Senate prepared to debate its maintain version of the Home-passed aid package.

Four days after the chamber’s parliamentarian said Senate ideas forbid inclusion of a straight-out minimum wage increase in the relaxation measure, Democrats appeared to have exhausted their most realistic options for hastily salvaging the pay hike. In one decision, they abandoned a potential amendment threatening tax increases on large companies that don’t enhance staff’ pay to certain ranges.

“At this second, we may now not have a path but I’m hoping we can glean one” for pushing the federal pay ground to $15 an hour, said No. 2 Senate Democratic leader Richard Durbin of Illinois.

Senate Democrats hope to unveil their version of the broad reduction package and start up debate as early as Wednesday. Congressional leaders want to ship President Joe Biden the legislation combating the pandemic and bolstering the economy by March 14, the date emergency jobless advantages that lawmakers approved in December expire.

5: 56 a.m.: A unusual relate by the Geneva-based Insecurity Insight and the College of California, Berkeley’s Human Rights Heart acknowledged extra than 1,100 threats or acts of violence against health care staff and facilities last year.

Researchers discovered that about 400 of those attacks had been related to COVID-19, many motivated by fear or frustration, underscoring the dangers surrounding health care staff at a time after they are needed most. Insecurity Insight defines a health care attack as any physical violence against or intimidation of health care staff or settings, and uses online news agencies, humanitarian teams and social media posts to track incidents around the arena.

“Our jobs in the emergency department and in hospitals have gotten exponentially extra disturbing and harder, and that’s at baseline even when folks are titanic supportive,” said Rohini Haar, an emergency physician in Oakland, California, and Human Rights Heart research fellow. “To conclude that work and to conclude it with dedication while being attacked or with the fear of being attacked is heartbreaking to me.”

Medical professionals from surgeons to paramedics have long confronted harm or intimidation on the job, especially in conflict zones. Experts say many attacks are rooted in fear or mistrust, as family individuals react to a relative’s death or a neighborhood responds to uncertainty around a disease. The coronavirus has amplified those tensions.

5: 55 a.m.: Austria’s leader says his country and Denmark intend to stay relying entirely on the European Union for coronavirus vaccines and will work with Israel to fabricate second-generation vaccines.

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Chancellor Sebastian Kurz plans to visit Israel with Danish Top Minister Mette Frederiksen on Thursday and confer with Top Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on vaccine research and production co-operation.

The EU has faced criticism for its gradual vaccine rollout, while Israel has vaccinated a large part of its population. Kurz said Tuesday to the Austria Press Agency that it was legal in precept to take a European-vast approach to inoculations, but maintained that the European Medicines Agency has been too gradual to approve vaccines and pointed to companies’ supply shortfalls.

He added: “We must prepare for additional mutations and must no longer be dependent entirely on the EU in the production of second-generation vaccines.”

APA reported that Kurz said Austria and Denmark “will no longer count on the EU sooner or later and will in the approaching years fabricate doses of second-generation vaccine for additional mutations of the coronavirus along with Israel as properly as researching collectively treatment probabilities.”

5: 55 a.m.: China’s vaccine diplomacy campaign has been a surprising success: It has pledged roughly half a billion doses of its vaccines to extra than 45 nations, according to a country-by-country tally by The Associated Press.

With just correct four of China’s many vaccine makers claiming they are able to fabricate at least 2.6 billion doses this year, a large part of the arena’s population will finish up inoculated now not with the fancy Western vaccines boasting headline-grabbing efficacy rates, but with China’s humble, traditionally made pictures.

Amid a dearth of public data on China’s vaccines, hesitations over their efficacy and safety are peaceful pervasive in the nations relying on them, along with concerns about what China may perhaps want in return for deliveries. Nonetheless, inoculations with Chinese vaccines already have begun in additional than 25 nations, and the Chinese pictures have been delivered to another 11, according to the AP tally, based on self reliant reporting in those nations along with govt and company announcements.

5: 54 a.m.: Serbia’s epidemiologists have called for the govt.to introduce a state of emergency and a strict lockdown to halt a surge in coronavirus infections in the Balkan country.

The numbers of daily unusual cases have been rising sharply in the nation of 7 million regardless of a mass inoculation campaign that has reached 1 million folks already.

Chief epidemiologist Predrag Kon on Tuesday advised the state RTS television that “we must ban contacts or we can break, and then realize what it means when the health gadget collapses.”

Health authorities say extra than 4,000 COVID-19 patients are hospitalized in Serbia and the country is reporting a few thousand unusual cases daily. Serbia has recorded nearly 4,500 virus-related deaths.

Experts have blamed the unusual surge on parties and nightclubs flouting anti-virus ideas as properly as on ski resorts that stayed start all cool weather.

Serbia has vaccinated most folks with China’s Sinopharm jabs, followed by Pfizer, Russia’s Sputnik V and currently AstraZeneca.

5: 53 a.m.: A majority of Canadians consider Ottawa will practice thru on its plan to present adequate COVID-19 vaccine doses for everyone who wants a shot by the fall, a unusual ballot suggests.

Fifty-six per cent of respondents are confident the federal govt can assume adequate vaccine to make distinct inoculation for those that discover it by September, according to an online gape by Léger and the Association for Canadian Research.

Canadians on each coasts and in Quebec had been optimistic about their provinces’ rollout plans as properly as that of the feds. Respondents in Ontario and the Prairies had been extra skeptical, with just correct one in three Albertans expressing faith in their govt’s supply way.

The ballot also discovered that most residents are in no accelerate to retract anti-pandemic lockdowns, with two-thirds saying restrictions must remain at least till half the population is immunized.

Léger executive vice-president Christian Bourque says the ramp-up in vaccine shipments last week probably brightened Canadians’ views of federal distribution efforts. Only two weeks ago, 69 per cent of respondents blamed Ottawa rather than provincial governments for delays in vaccine supply, Léger discovered.

5: 51 a.m.: Essential staff who are extra prone to contract and transmit COVID-19 needs to be prioritized for immunization with the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine now that a national panel is now not recommending it for seniors, two experts say.

Caroline Colijn, a COVID-19 modeller and mathematician at Simon Fraser College, and Horatio Bach, an adjunct professor in the division of infectious diseases at the College of British Columbia, also say the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine will be better promoted by provincial health officials as a strong contender to the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines.

The National Advisory Committee on Immunization has instantaneous that the Oxford-AstraZeneca now not be frail for folks 65 and over as a consequence of concern about restricted data on how this may work in older populations, even after Health Canada authorized its consume last week for all adults.

Oxford-AstraZeneca reported about 62 per cent effectiveness at struggling with COVID-19 while Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna have said the efficacy of their vaccines is about 95 per cent.

Colijn and Bach say the fact that there have been no hospitalizations from severe illness and no deaths among those the usage of Oxford-AstraZeneca needs to be underscored because folks awaiting immunization appear to be fixated on the greater efficacy data for the primary two vaccines approved in Canada.

“If the AstraZeneca vaccine will forestall you from getting really unwell that’s peaceful a purchase for you,” Colijn said.

“I discover this sizable, sizable befriend of vaccinating formative years, particularly folks with excessive contact, essential staff, sooner.”

5: 50 a.m.: Canada’s unusual attempting out and quarantine ideas for international air travellers appear to have convinced even extra Canadians to stay set aside in contemporary weeks.

Most Canadians had been heeding the govt.s plea now not to travel outside the country, with or with out the unusual restrictions.

Weekly statistics supplied by the Canada Border Services Agency reveal international air travel at some point of the pandemic is much less than a 10th what it was sooner than COVID-19.

The data reveal there was a small increase in international air travel after Christmas, with almost 170,000 folks arriving in Canada between Dec. 28 and Jan. 10.

That compares with about 128,000 between Dec. 14 and Dec. 27.

Within the last two weeks of January international arrivals fell to 106,000 folks, and in the primary two weeks of February, the figure fell additional to 94,000 folks.

The topple in international arrivals in early February is about four instances the decline considered between early January and early February in 2019 and 2020.

It came after Ottawa started making all international air travellers reveal proof of negative COVID-19 exams sooner than boarding their planes.

4 a.m.: The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Tuesday, March 2, 2021.

In Canada, the provinces are reporting 66,691 unusual vaccinations administered for a total of 1,949,643 doses given. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 5,144.275 per 100,000.

There have been 500 unusual vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 2,442,170 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have frail 79.83 per cent of their available vaccine present.

4 a.m.: The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Tuesday, March 2, 2021.

There are 870,033 confirmed cases in Canada (30,430 active, 817,586 resolved, 22,017 deaths).The total case depend contains 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There have been 2,559 unusual cases Monday. The rate of active cases is 80.07 per 100,000 folks. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 20,525 unusual cases. The seven-day rolling average of unusual cases is 2,932.

There have been 23 unusual reported deaths Monday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 295 unusual reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of unusual reported deaths is 42. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.11 per 100,000 folks. The overall death rate is 57.93 per 100,000 folks.

There have been 24,545,470 exams achieved.

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Today’s coronavirus news: Most Canadians confident vaccine rollout is back on track: ballot; International air travel a fraction of pre-pandemic instances; AstraZeneca vaccine needs better promotion, expert