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US Census Bureau to kick off redistricting battle with release of 2020 data – live

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US Census Bureau to kick off redistricting battle with release of 2020 data – live

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Politics recap

Joan E Greve

  • The most modern data from the 2020 Census showed that US inhabitants development used to be driven by cities and minorities, because the nation’s non-hispanic white inhabitants fell under 60% for the foremost time. The data, released this afternoon by the US Census Bureau, might maybe contain massive implications on the redistricting task, as states launch redrawing congressional district traces for next yr’s midterm elections.
  • The US navy is readily deploying about 3,000 troops to Kabul as some American embassy employees evacuate Afghanistan. Pentagon spokesperson John Kirby confirmed the deployment, asserting the navy assistance used to be foremost because of the “without warning deteriorating security state in and spherical Kabul”. The announcement comes as Taliban forces proceed to resolve adjust of foremost cities all the map in which thru the nation, intensifying concerns that Kabul will quickly drop as properly.
  • Joe Biden criticized Republican governors who’re attempting to ban hide mandates in faculties, because the Delta variant of coronavirus wreaks havoc all the map in which thru the US. “This isn’t about politics. Here is about conserving our kids stable,” Biden stated. Thanking the native officials who’re attempting to fight the hide mandates, Biden stated, “I stand with you all, and The usa might maybe well also honest unexcited as properly.”
  • The Texas Senate passed a invoice that can well impose contemporary voting restrictions within the state, after Democratic state senator Carol Alvarado staged a 15-hour filibuster over the regulations. The invoice unexcited needs to pass the Texas Home, where Republicans lack the quorum foremost to attain regulations because of the Democrats who live out of the state. Texas Republicans deputized law enforcement to bring together Home Democrats and enforce a quorum.
  • The department of health and human companies issued a vaccine requirement for its healthcare employees. The requirement, which can note to more than 25,000 HHS employees, comes after the department of veterans affairs announced a identical mandate for its healthcare employees.

Texas Republicans contain deputized law enforcement to bring together Home Democrats who contain fled the state capitol in expose to reveal the quorum wanted to pass dramatic contemporary voting restrictions.

Law enforcement has been tasked with bringing in Democrats after the state Supreme Court allowed for their civil arrests. “Earlier today the Home Sergeant-at-Arms deputized contributors of Texas law enforcement to aid within the Home’s efforts to compel a quorum. That task will launch in earnest right away,” stated Enrique Marquez, a spokesman for Republican Home Speaker Dade Phelan, in an announcement.

Democrat Gene Wu told the Texas Tribune that he and 44 of his colleagues contain gotten non permanent safety from the warrants from Harris County.

“No one can detain or stagger us aid to the Home floor towards our will,” Wu told the Tribune. “We might maybe well also no longer be willing contributors within the silencing of our communities.”

Learn more on the escalating fight over voting restrictions in Texas here:

The National Congress of American Indians released an announcement on the US Census outcomes, celebrating findings that the American Indian and Alaska Native has elevated, and urging Tribal Nations to participate in redistricting efforts.

“NCAI is furious to discover the 2020 Census outcomes that describe a more diverse The usa,” stated NCAI President Fawn Consuming. “We are also furious that the official redistricting season can now launch with today’s release of the redistricting data. We are encouraging all Tribal Nations to participate of their native and state redistricting efforts to be obvious that Tribal Nations are quite represented and contain bag admission to to the assets they need and deserve.”

The American Indian and Alaska Native elevated from 5.2m in 2010 to 9.7m in 2020.

“Today, we are satisfied that the 2020 Census data describe the amplify in fluctuate within the US, and a gigantic amplify within the AI/AN inhabitants,” stated Dante Desiderio, NCAI Chief Executive Officer. “American Indians and Alaska Natives are a foremost half of American history, and we hope these data order efforts to be obvious that our faculties relate more American Indian and Alaska Native history of their classes about American history. Tribal Nations fabricate principal contributions to the native, state, and regional economies and contain a properly to effect and vivid custom that contributes positively to the previous and new history of the US.”

Nearly half of American employees don’t plan sufficient to contain satisfactory money a one-bedroom rental

Andrew Witherspoon and Alvin Chang document:

Nearly half of American employees develop no longer plan sufficient to lease a one-bedroom rental, according to contemporary data.

Rents within the US continued to amplify thru the pandemic, and a employee now needs to plan about $20.40 an hour to contain satisfactory money a modest one-bedroom rental. The median wage within the US is about $21 an hour.

The data, from the National Low Profits Housing Coalition, shows that hundreds and hundreds of American citizens – from Amazon warehouse employees to cab drivers to public faculty teachers – are struggling to pay lease. For the poorest American citizens, market-price housing is out of attain in near to all of the nation.

About 14% of American citizens fell within the aid of on lease payments right thru the pandemic – roughly double the resolve before the pandemic. A federal moratorium on evictions has saved renters from being kicked out of their properties, however the moratorium lapsed closing month, most inspiring to be prolonged into early October for these in regions hardest hit by the pandemic.

And it’s no longer appropriate tall cities skewing the data. A two-bedroom rental – an inexpensive size for a family – would stretch the budgets of renters in most US counties.

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Updated

More than 9,000 anti-Asian incidents reported in US since pandemic started

More than 9,000 anti-Asian incidents contain been reported all the map in which thru the US for the explanation that coronavirus pandemic began, according to a document released on Thursday.

Stop AAPI Abominate, a national coalition that tracks and responds to racially motivated abhor crimes towards Asian American citizens and Pacific Islanders, got 9,081 experiences between 19 March 2020 and this June. A total of 4,548 abhor crimes occurred in 2020 and every other 4,533 occurred in 2021.

For the explanation that coronavirus used to be first reported in China, contributors of Asian American and Pacific Islander communities all the map in which thru the US contain faced bigotry within the plan of verbal harassment and physical assaults. Many blame Donald Trump for helping to hasten anti-Asian sentiment through the use of racist phrases when referring to the virus, similar to “Chinese language virus” and “kung flu”.

According to the document, 63.7% of the incidents enthusiastic verbal harassment and 16.5% enthusiastic shunning – the deliberate avoidance of Asian American citizens and Pacific Islanders. About 13.7% of the experiences contain been of physical assault, the third-excellent category of total reported incidents. Civil rights violations accounted for 11% of the incidents whereas on-line harassment made up 8.3%.

Incidents reported by females made up 63.3% of all experiences.

The number of seniors – 60 years extinct and older – reporting abhor crimes elevated from 6.5% in 2020 to 7.2% in 2021. For the explanation that pandemic began, the majority of the headline-making assaults contain enthusiastic senior Asians all the map in which thru the nation, with many being overwhelmed, kicked, shoved or stabbed.

“In case you aid abhor, it’s no longer esteem a genie in a bottle where you might maybe well perchance pull it out and push it aid in everytime you need to contain,” stated Manjusha Kulkarni, co-founder of Stop AAPI Abominate and executive director of the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council. “There’s too powerful perpetuating these perception systems to fabricate them dash away.”

Learn more:

Analysis: US deserves tall fragment of blame for Afghanistan navy catastrophe

Julian Borger

The UK appropriate announced it is joining the US in sending extra troops to Afghanistan to wait on evacuate nationals. amid the immediate attain of the Taliban.

As one provincial capital after every other has fallen to the Taliban, the message from Washington to the Afghans dealing with the onslaught has been that their survival is of their very possess fingers.

“They’ve got to fight for themselves, fight for their nation,” Joe Biden stated. Jen Psaki, the White Home spokeswoman, added: “They’ve what they need. What they need to resolve is whether or no longer or no longer they’ve the political will to fight aid.”

But regardless of more than $80bn in US security assistance since 2002 and an annual navy budget a long way in excess of other putting in nations, Afghan navy resistance to the Taliban is collapsing with elevated rush than even most pessimists had predicted. There’s discuss among US officials of Kabul falling in months – if no longer weeks.

Interviews with former officials who contain been intimately serious about US protection in Afghanistan point to an interconnected webs of factors within the aid of the implosion, some of them long within the making, some a consequence of decisions taken within the previous few months.

While there’s consensus that a failure of leadership and cohesion in Kabul has done a extraordinarily foremost half within the domino-drop of defeats, there’ll likely be settlement that the strive to effect the total blame on the Afghans obscures the fragment of accountability of the US and its allies for the navy catastrophe.

The candid assessments of US and allied officials and soldiers recorded in congressionally mandated “classes realized” experiences obtained by the Washington Post fabricate definite some of the issues so evident today had their origins on the onset of the US-led navy presence within the nation.

Learn more:

Meet Joe Biden’s secret weapon: the girl who wrangles with Congress

Within the early days of the Biden administration contributors of the contemporary president’s White Home legislative affairs team had a meet-and-greet with Senate Republicans’ chiefs of employees. At the top of this Democratic delegation used to be Louisa Terrell, Biden’s White Home director of the office of legislative affairs.

Terrell, talking to the target market of highly efficient Republican aides, laid out how she worked. She felt even in these politically polarized cases compromise ought to be pursued. They wouldn’t agree on every little thing, but there contain been offers to be had. At the same time Terrell stated, according to four sources with data of this assembly, her team had a job to develop and deliberate to develop it.

Terrell’s speech illustrated how she is the tip of the spear of the Biden administration’s team as she fulfills one of essentially the most complex jobs in The usa’s deeply divided political landscape: Biden’s congressional fixer and legislative e-book. Terrell is the chief of the team that takes a proposal from the White Home and shepherds it thru the winding and barely narrow halls of Congress so it ought to bag aid to the president’s desk to grow to be law. She is the actual individual that targets to bag things performed and who’s in designate of ushering protection proposals thru the congressional maze.

Within the course of his presidential marketing campaign and, no doubt, thru the moment he stepped into the Oval Office as president, Joe Biden has argued that tall bipartisan offers are value pursuing and doable even now. Biden, a multi-decade used of the Senate, has argued his roots into each parties in Congress rush deep and might maybe well also fabricate mountainous bipartisan offers.

Enter Terrell, a longtime Biden hand and former chief of employees to senators whose résumé also entails stints at some of essentially the most establishment corners of the up to date American economic system – McKinsey & Firm, Yahoo and Fb among others. She might maybe well also honest no longer contain powerful of a public profile exterior Washington’s corridors of vitality, but internal Terrell is a foremost participant. She has been within the room at essentially the most pivotal moments of essentially the most foremost legislative initiatives right thru the Biden administration.

Learn more:

Today to this point

That’s it from me today. My west hover colleague, Maanvi Singh, will salvage over the blog for the next few hours.

Here’s where the day stands to this point:

  • The most modern data from the 2020 Census showed that US inhabitants development used to be driven by cities and minorities, because the nation’s non-hispanic white inhabitants fell under 60% for the foremost time. The data, released this afternoon by the US Census Bureau, might maybe contain massive implications on the redistricting task, as states launch redrawing congressional district traces for next yr’s midterm elections.
  • The US navy is readily deploying about 3,000 troops to Kabul as some American embassy employees evacuate Afghanistan. Pentagon spokesperson John Kirby confirmed the deployment, asserting the navy assistance used to be foremost because of the “without warning deteriorating security state in and spherical Kabul”. The announcement comes as Taliban forces proceed to resolve adjust of foremost cities all the map in which thru the nation, intensifying concerns that Kabul will quickly drop as properly.
  • Joe Biden criticized Republican governors who’re attempting to ban hide mandates in faculties, because the Delta variant of coronavirus wreaks havoc all the map in which thru the US. “This isn’t about politics. Here is about conserving our kids stable,” Biden stated. Thanking the native officials who’re attempting to fight the hide mandates, Biden stated, “I stand with you all, and The usa might maybe well also honest unexcited as properly.”
  • The Texas Senate passed a invoice that can well impose contemporary voting restrictions within the state, after Democratic state senator Carol Alvarado staged a 15-hour filibuster over the regulations. The invoice unexcited needs to pass the Texas Home, where Republicans lack the quorum foremost to attain regulations because of the Democrats who live out of the state.
  • The department of health and human companies issued a vaccine requirement for its healthcare employees. The requirement, which can note to more than 25,000 HHS employees, comes after the department of veterans affairs announced a identical mandate for its healthcare employees.

Maanvi might maybe contain more coming up, so deal with tuned.

The Guardian’s Sam Levine has more dinky print on the latest data from the 2020 Census:

The usa’s white inhabitants declined over the closing decade whereas US metro areas contain been accountable for near to all of the nation’s inhabitants development, according to principal contemporary data released Thursday by the US census bureau.

Overall, the white-by myself inhabitants fell by 8.6% since 2010, the bureau stated on Thursday. Non-hispanic whites now fable for spherical 58% of The usa’s inhabitants, a fall from 2010 when they made up 63.7% of the inhabitants. It used to be the foremost time that the non-hispanic white inhabitants has fallen under 60% for the explanation that census began.

Essentially the most diverse states in The usa, as measured by the bureau’s fluctuate index, contain been Hawaii, California, Nevada, Texas, Maryland, the District of Columbia, Fresh Jersey and Fresh York. In Texas, the white and Hispanic or Latino inhabitants are getting powerful nearer. Whites made up 39.7% of the inhabitants, whereas Hispanics and Latinos made up 39.3%. The bureau also stated there used to be a engaging spike within the number of these that often known as multiracial.

“Our analysis of the 2020 census describe that the US inhabitants is a long way more multiracial and more racially and ethnically diverse than what we measured within the previous,” stated Nicholas Jones, the director and senior adviser of rush and ethnic study and outreach, within the census bureau’s inhabitants division.

The most modern 2020 Census data from the US Census Bureau shows that a number of Fresh York boroughs had stronger than expected inhabitants gains over the previous decade.

Queens county seen the excellent upward push in inhabitants, increasing its resident rely by 8% over ten years, per Dave Wasserman of the Cook Political Chronicle.

Dave Wasserman
(@Redistrict)

Sizable U.S. counties w/ stronger than expected Census counts (vs. estimates):

1. Queens, NY +8%

2. Brooklyn, NY +8%

3. Honolulu, HI +5%

4. Bronx, NY +5%

5. Fresh york, NY +5%

6. Westchester, NY +4%

7. Suffolk, NY +4%

8. Nassau, NY +3%

9. Cook, IL +3%

10. Allegheny, PA +3%

August 12, 2021

Overall, the Fresh York congressional delegation is anticipated to shrink by one seat due to the outcomes of the 2020 Census, after the state got here up 89 residents short of conserving its new number of Home seats.

The Census numbers suggest Fresh York will most inspiring contain 26 Home seats inspiring forward, continuing a decades-long decline within the state’s inhabitants and (accordingly) its congressional illustration.

Wasserman stated the Census data from Fresh York Metropolis “almost single-handedly saved Fresh York from shedding two congressional seats” and got here finish to saving each seats.

Dave Wasserman
(@Redistrict)

Poring over the data, and it is definite NYC’s stronger-than-expected rely almost single-handedly saved Fresh York from shedding two congressional seats; genuinely it got here finish to saving Fresh York all 27 of its seats.

August 12, 2021

The Guardian’s Dani Anguiano experiences on San Francisco’s contemporary vaccine mandate:

San Francisco will require residents to describe proof of Covid-19 vaccination to enter drinking locations, gyms and film theaters and other public spaces. It’s put of abode to salvage develop on Monday.

The pass comes because the Delta variant has led to a upward push in US cases, primarily among the unvaccinated. Fresh York Metropolis closing week turned into the foremost within the US to mandate that of us describe proof of vaccination for indoor eating, gyms and leisure venues.

But the mandate is more stringent than the requirement announced by Fresh York. San Francisco will require proof of tubby vaccination for all customers and employees, whereas Fresh York mandated proof of on the least one shot for indoor actions.

London Breed
(@LondonBreed)

Vaccines are our methodology out of this pandemic. They’re how we can live our lives together, safely.

San Francisco will likely be requiring proof of vaccination for patrons and employees in a bunch of indoor settings, including bars, drinking locations, gyms, and gigantic events.

August 12, 2021

Los Angeles is brooding about a identical pass requiring of us to contain on the least one dose of a Covid-19 vaccine before going to indoor drinking locations, bars, gyms, film theaters and other venues.

On Wednesday, governor Gavin Newsom stated all employees at public and non-public faculties in California might maybe contain to describe proof of vaccination or face weekly trying out.

California officials contain re-launched safety measures in response to the Covid resurgence. The state’s public health department has prompt residents effect on masks in public indoor settings, regardless of vaccination living, and more than one counties contain reinstated hide mandates.

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US Census Bureau to kick off redistricting battle with release of 2020 data – live