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Wall mural of Gord Downie in Sicamous, B.C., also aims to be message of action

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Wall mural of Gord Downie in Sicamous, B.C., also aims to be message of action

A colourful wall mural with a message of action is now on indicate in B.C.’s Shuswap boom.

Early Newspaper

The mural is of Canadian rock icon Gord Downie, lead singer of the Tragically Hip, who died of a terminal brain tumour in 2017.

Downie was once an suggest for Indigenous rights and reconciliation, and June is National Indigenous History Month.

The mural is located at 1214 Riverside Avenue in Sicamous and was once created by Kelowna artist Bobby Vandenhoorn.

The building that it’s painted on hosts a invent work studio and a co-fragment workspace.

“When I offered the building, I wished to pay tribute to the history of Sicamous,” said Brenda Dalzell, proprietor of the 70-year-aged building and a neighborhood shrimp business.

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“I wished to develop a visual interest in downtown Sicamous. So I had belief of loads of various murals to put on there.”


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In some scheme, Dalzell said, “it became definite to me that I wished to finish something that left a message, that it resonated, that it was once bigger than a share of art; it in truth told a story.”

Downie’s efforts on Indigenous rights, said Dalzell, was once that message.

“In the occasion you train Gord Downie and the (Gord Downie and Chanie Wenjack Fund), he left us with this message: A call to finish something,” said Dalzell.

“It became definite to me that it was once my time to protect action, to ship a message, to fragment the vision and the fervour of Gord Downie — to bring Indigenous and non-Indigenous folks together.”

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“Who doesn’t love Gord Downie? He’s this kind of Canadian icon,” said Vandenhoorn, who spent roughly 15 hours creating the mural.

“He represents loads bigger than his song. He’s a proud Canadian, nevertheless he’s also a large supporter of the Indigenous community.”

Vandenhoorn says he enjoys creating murals of musicians. To scrutinize some of his paintings, refer to his Instagram internet page.


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Wall mural of Gord Downie in Sicamous, B.C., also aims to be message of action